Regenerative metabolic signaling after nerve and spinal injury

Authors:
Elisabeth SERGER, G. KONG, I. PALMISANO, E. MCLACHLAN, S. DI GIOVANNI

Elisabeth Serger, PhD Student in the Prof. Simone Di Giovanni Lab

Lab Abstract:
Mammalian axonal regeneration is limited in the injured peripheral nervous system (PNS) occur and it fails in the central nervous system (CNS) such as after a spinal cord injury (SCI), strongly contributing to unsuccessful functional recovery. While we have been gaining knowledge in regenerative neuronal signaling pathways, the role of metabolic signaling remains rather elusive. Here, we hypothesize that injury as well as metabolism related signaling pathways might converge to regulate the axonal regenerative ability of sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We performed high throughput unbiased studies investigating changes in metabolism and cell signaling to identify key regulatory mechanisms for the success of sensory axonal regrowth after injury. Currently, we are investigating the mechanisms underpinning metabolic signaling dependent regenerative phenotype. We next intend to manipulate the identified key pathways by gene therapy and/or pharmacologically to enhance the regeneration program. This will ultimately offer a new pathway to clinical translation for nerve repair after injury.

Grant Support: ISRT, Nathalie Rose Barr Studentship

Abstract Citation
*E. SERGER1, G. KONG2, I. PALMISANO1, E. MCLACHLAN1, S. DI GIOVANNI1;
1Imperial Col. London, London, United Kingdom; 2Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany. Regenerative metabolic signaling after nerve and spinal injury. Program No. 213.17. 2018 Neuroscience Meeting Planner. San Diego, CA: Society for Neuroscience, 2018. Online.

This entry was posted in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Research, Neuroscience Abstracts, Regenerative Medicine, spinal cord injury research and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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