SCI: MRI shows not all sensation is lost

See the Full Article LINK at Neuroscience Research Australia:

Researchers from Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), The University of Sydney, and HammondCare have found surviving sensory nerve connections in areas of no sensation in 50% of people living with complete thoracic spinal cord injuries.

The breakthrough study by Wrigley, Siddall and Gustin used cutting edge functional MRI (fMRI) technology to record neural response to touch. NeuRA’s Dr Sylvia Gustin analysed the fMRI images to identify the moment the patient’s brain registered the touch.

Dr Gustin said seeing the brain light up to touch shows, despite complete injury of the thoracic spine, somatosensory pathways have been preserved.

See the Full Article LINK at Neuroscience Research Australia:

All Sensation is Not Lost in Thoracic Spinal Cord Injuries

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This entry was posted in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Research, Rehabilitation, Spinal Research and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to SCI: MRI shows not all sensation is lost

  1. K says:

    I experience this myself. It’s been 5 months since my accident, and I have been diagnosed T12 complete paraplegic (both sense and motor function). When I very lightly touch/tickle the skin and or hairs on the backside of my legs (sacral side) I sense or become aware of something faintly touching, this differs from spot to spot.

    • Anonymous says:

      T9 complete and I feel the same down to my knee. Light touch/ pressure. Something is getting by.

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