Electrical implant reduces ‘invisible’ symptoms of man’s spinal cord injury

An experimental treatment that sends electrical currents through the spinal cord has improved ‘invisible’ yet debilitating side effects for a Canadian man with a spinal cord injury.

A diving accident six years ago left Isaac Darrel, of Langley, British Columbia, with a spinal cord injury. Side effects of the injury include dizziness, fluctuations in blood pressure and changes in bladder and bowel function.

Darrel made the decision to have electrodes surgically implanted over his spinal cord in 2016 to test out a treatment known as epidural stimulation in the hopes of improving some of the side effects. A case study about his experiences was published today in JAMA Neurology.

Full Article at Science Daily News

Association of Epidural Stimulation With Cardiovascular Function in an Individual With Spinal Cord Injury
Christopher R. West et al. Association of Epidural Stimulation With Cardiovascular Function in an Individual With Spinal Cord Injury. JAMA Neurology, 2018 DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.5055

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