Monkeys Regain Control Of Paralyzed Legs With Help Of An Implant

Two devices were implanted into the monkeys' bodies: (above) a tiny electrode array in the brain and another (below) in the lower spine to signal leg muscles when to move. Alain Herzog/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)

Two devices were implanted into the monkeys’ bodies: (above) a tiny electrode array in the brain and another (below) in the lower spine to signal leg muscles when to move.
Alain Herzog/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)

A few months ago, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch emerged from a 10-hour surgery that she hadn’t done before. “Most of my patients are humans,” says Bloch, who works at the Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland. This patient was a rhesus macaque. The monkey’s spinal cord had been partially cut. So while his brain was fine and his legs were fine, the two couldn’t communicate.

Two devices were implanted into the monkeys’ bodies: a tiny electrode array in the brain and another in the lower spine to signal leg muscles when to move.

See the Full Article HERE

The findings were published Wednesday in the journal Nature HERE.

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