A novel method for recording long term EMG activity in the laboratory and at home in individuals with cervical SCI

Society for Neuroscience Chicago Nanosymposium Advances in SCI Research and Plasticity
We have previously recorded long term EMG activity using shorts with embedded electromyography (EMG) sensors on healthy subjects (Finni et al. 2007) and office workers (Pesola et al. 2014). However, we do not have detailed information about long term muscle activity in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Such information allows us to have specific details on the normal and abnormal patterns of muscle activity during an individual’s daily life outside of the laboratory and see the changes in activation patterns after rehabilitation interventions. EMG was recorded from eight upper limb muscles using a custom-made shirt with embedded EMG electrodes. Data was stored into a data collection module attached to the shirt. Five participants (injury levels C5-7) were asked to come in to the laboratory to perform exercises such as handgrip tasks, relaxation, and wheeling in the corridor with a wheelchair. After the testing the participants went home and wore the shirt for the rest of the day (mean 7hrs, range 3-13hrs). EMG was analyzed as mean values during exercises in the laboratory. Home recordings were analyzed using burst analysis modified from Kern et al. 2001 and Tikkanen et al. 2013. Average burst time when muscles were considered active was 52±10.8 % of the recording time. Average burst duration was 0.4 ±0.1 sec and average burst rate 1.8±0.5 bps. Average duration of the longest period of inactivity was 2.9±2.7 min, and average amplitude during daily testing was 50.8±4.8 % (36.7-68.6 %) of the activity level during wheeling. Wearable EMG recording system allows us to access more detailed information about rehabilitation progress outside of the laboratory. Because all wires are integrated into the shirt, no additional devices are needed, and patients experience no restriction in their movements.

Presentation Number: 197.03 Support: UCLA CTSI Grant UL1TR000124 NIH NIBIB Grant U01EB015521 Authors: *P. HAAKANA1, D. SAYENKO2, A. J. PESOLA4, T. FINNI4, V. R. EDGERTON3, D. C. LU1; 1UCLA Neurosurg., Los Angeles, CA; 2Integrative biology and physiology, 3Physiological science, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA; 4Biol. of physical activity, Univ. of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla, Finland Disclosures: P. Haakana: E. Ownership Interest (stock, stock options, royalty, receipt of intellectual property rights/patent holder, excluding diversified mutual funds); Lu Daniel C, Edgerton Reggie V. D. Sayenko: None. A.J. Pesola: None. T. Finni: None. V.R. Edgerton: E. Ownership Interest (stock, stock options, royalty, receipt of intellectual property rights/patent holder, excluding diversified mutual funds); Victor R Edgerton. D.C. Lu: E. Ownership Interest (stock, stock options, royalty, receipt of intellectual property rights/patent holder, excluding diversified mutual funds); Daniel C Lu.

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