IKVAV-linked cell membrane-spanning peptide treatment induces neuronal reactivation following spinal cord injury

John Enrique Mata, Ph.D. Associate Professor College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific Northwest

John Enrique Mata, Ph.D. Associate Professor College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific Northwest

In the latest publication from Future Science OA, John Enrique Mata and colleagues from Oregon State University (OR, USA) and Western University of Health Sciences (CA, USA) assess a novel membrane-spanning peptide (MSP) expressing the isoleucine-lysine-valine-alanine-valine (IKVAV) epitope in mice, following hemi-laminectomy and compression injury. Following assessment of functional improvement via mBB and spinal cord segments via histology, the researchers report significantly improved scores in IKVAV-MSP mice compared with control after 4 weeks, accompanied by a greater number of astrocytes, neurons and muscle bundle size. They suggest that further research should be performed over a longer time period and in a greater number of animals to determine whether these improvements are maintained, and look forward to further work utilizing membrane-spanning peptides for presentation of bioactive molecules for stem cell therapy.

A new potential treatment for spinal cord injury was tested in mice. Mice were treated with our membrane-spanning peptide with the IKVAV motif (IKVAV-MSP) or various control treatments. Functional improvement was assessed daily and spinal cord segments were evaluated after 4 weeks. IKVAV-MSP treatment significantly restored function compared with control groups, numbers of health nerve cells within the spinal cord were increased and muscles appeared healthier. This study demonstrates that it is possible to promote functional recovery after SCI using bioactive IKVAV presenting cell membrane-spanning peptides.

Read the Full Publication Open Access HERE:

Soheila Kazemi, Wendy Baltzer, Karl Schilke, Hadi Mansouri, John Enrique Mata. IKVAV-linked cell membrane-spanning peptide treatment induces neuronal reactivation following spinal cord injury. Future Sci. OA FSO81 doi:10.4155/fso.15.81 (2015).

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