Neuralstem Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cell Trial Approved To Commence At University Of California, San Diego (NSI-566 to be Tested in Patients with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury)

Neuralstem, Inc. announced that the Institutional Review Board of the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine has approved the Phase I safety trial to treat chronic spinal cord injury (cSCI) with its NSI-566 stem cells. The NSI-566/cSCI Phase I trial will enroll patients with thoracic spinal cord injuries (T2-T12) who have an American Spinal Injury Association (AIS) A level of impairment, between one and two years after injury. AIS A impairment, which is complete paralysis, refers to a patient with no motor or sensory function in the relevant segments at and below the injury. The trial, which already has FDA approval, and has a one-year completion goal, will be under the direction of principal investigator (PI) Joseph Ciacci, MD, UC San Diego School of Medicine and neurosurgeon at UC San Diego Health System. Much of the pre-clinical work with the NSI-566 cells in spinal cord injury was conducted at UC San Diego School of Medicine by Martin Marsala, MD, professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, who will be another study investigator.

Read the full Neuralstem Inc. press release article HERE:

This trial, which has received approval by the Institutional Review Board of the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, will enroll up to eight chronic SCI patients with thoracic spinal cord injuries (T2-T12), who have an American Spinal Injury Association (AIS) grade A level of impairment one-to-two years post-injury. AIS A impairment refers to a patient with no motor or sensory function in the relevant segments at and below the injury, and is considered to be complete paralysis.

The link to clinical trials.gov for candidates.

The Wall Street Journal article HERE:

CNN News HERE:

‘Understanding the Practicalities of Using Innovative Therapies on Patients’ at the World Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine Congress

Richard Garr talks about the ALS trial in the video below.

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