ON THE FAST TRACK: Speeding Science to Patients

The School’s Council to Advance Human Health recommended Susann Brady-Kalnay, PhD, expand the potential market for her fluorescent imaging agent for brain tumor cells. Above: School of Medicine scientists like Jerry Silver, PhD (left), now have access to two chief translational officers, Blair Geho, MD, PhD (right), and Bill Harte, PhD, who bring pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry experience.

The School’s Council to Advance Human Health recommended Susann Brady-Kalnay, PhD, expand the potential market for her fluorescent imaging agent for brain tumor cells. Above: School of Medicine scientists like Jerry Silver, PhD (left), now have access to two chief translational officers, Blair Geho, MD, PhD (right), and Bill Harte, PhD, who bring pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry experience.

Thanks to simple shots of a novel peptide, paralyzed rats regained the ability to walk, and also recovered their lost bladder function. But can a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-Sigma (PTP-Sigma) blocking peptide—whose stunning potential to reverse spinal cord injury’s destruction was discovered in the laboratory of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine neurosciences professor Jerry Silver, PhD [GRS’74]—similarly revitalize people with spinal cord injury? Recent National Institutes of Health-cited statistics suggest the potential in people might never be known, with 80 to 90 percent of research projects never reaching testing in humans to define their potential as real-world therapies. Silver, though, has won a precious chance to move his scientific discovery toward potential patient benefit. His research was pegged by the school’s two newly recruited chief translational officers as a project that could be destined for clinical success. Further buoying his translational aspirations: an emphatic vote of confidence from a newly formed brain trust of School of Medicine alumni and friends, called the Council to Advance Human Health (CAHH). Convened by School of Medicine Dean Pamela B. Davis MD, PhD, and championed by other school leaders including the school’s Vice Dean for Research Mark Chance, PhD, the council is helping to move the school’s best-bet scientific discoveries toward application as life-changing therapies.

Read the full article HERE:

Dr. Silver’s latest video presentation from the 8th Annual Working 2 Walk Symposium can be accessed here, courtesy of Unite 2 Fight Paralysis.

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